Climate Change Symposium

Auckland | Wellington | Christchurch | Online

The New Zealand Geotechnical Society in partnership with Engineering New Zealand, The Sustainability Society and MBIE will host a symposium to discuss the role of geotechnical engineers in climate change.

The symposium will engage the geotechnical industry in New Zealand and start discussions on how our industry can reach the carbon emission goals set by the New Zealand government. What does it mean for the geotechnical industry in New Zealand? Where do we need to stretch, collaborate and re-invent ourselves to meet the targets? Regardless if you work as a consultant, contractor, academic or policy maker, we are looking for a broad range of different opinions as this topic is important for all of us and collaboration, innovation and transformation are critical to start the process.

We hope to spark your interest and stimulate many constructive discussions about this topic and we want to hear different opinions and approaches how to overcome some of the current barriers. Collaboration is the key to reach these targets and help building a more sustainable future.

NZGS Climate Change Symposium

The New Zealand Geotechnical Society in partnership with Engineering New Zealand, The Sustainability Society and MBIE will host a symposium to discuss the role of geotechnical engineers in climate change.

The symposium will engage the geotechnical industry in New Zealand and start discussions on how our industry can reach the carbon emission goals set by the New Zealand government. What does it mean for the geotechnical industry in New Zealand? Where do we need to stretch, collaborate and re-invent ourselves to meet the targets? Regardless if you work as a consultant, contractor, academic or policy maker, we are looking for a broad range of different opinions as this topic is important for all of us and collaboration, innovation and transformation are critical to start the process.

We hope to spark your interest and stimulate many constructive discussions about this topic and we want to hear different opinions and approaches how to overcome some of the current barriers. Collaboration is the key to reach these targets and help building a more sustainable future.

We are delighted to invite you to submit a presentation abstract and to register your attendance. Presentations will be short (10-15 mins) and we are specifically seeking presentations around the following topics:

  • Innovation
  • Challenges
  • Tools and techniques
    • adaptation, transition and mitigation
    • overcoming barriers to climate ready project

Preparation of a paper is not required. However, authors are welcome to submit a paper in support of their presentation should they wish to do so. Closing date for abstracts is 8 August.

We hope to hear from you with an abstract and to see you in September for this inaugural symposium.

The role of a peer reviewer in geotechnical design.

Join the New Zealand Geotechnical Society in their upcoming panel discussion – The role of a peer reviewer in geotechnical design.

Details and Registration HERE

This in-person panel discussion on the role of a peer reviewer in geotechnical design brings together panellists comprising technical directors/principals with extensive experience on the consulting, contracting and client sides.

Presenters: Andrew Campbell, Geoff Farquhar, Martin Larisch, Robert Hillier & Ross Roberts

The event will last approximately an hour and will comprise an introductory talk on the responsibilites and liabilities of a peer reviewer followed by short talks by each panellist based on their experience. The event will conclude with a Q&A session.

Please submit a maximum of three questions that you’d like to ask the panellists via the comments section on the registration form.

Drinks and nibbles provided and a thanks to our sponsors: Brian Perry Civil and Piletech

Details and Registration HERE

Free Webinar: The (R)Evolution of Monitoring

Presented by John King and Ryan Milligan (Geotechnics)

As digitisation picks up speed within the industry, connecting engineers to their data in a timely manner is becoming increasingly important. John and Ryan would like to share some of their lessons and experiences from the past as well as predictions for the future.

Equipping you with the knowledge you need to make the most of your data, sensors and monitoring and to enable you to deliver a better, safer and more sustainable service to your clients.

John King and Ryan Milligan have been intimately involved with Geotechnical instrumentation for their entire careers at Geotechnics. With combined experience exceeding 20 years, they have gathered some interesting insights along the way.

Please register for free HERE

Liquefaction Assessment of Natural Pumiceous Deposits

Presented by Dr Rolando Orense
Associate Professor, University of Auckland

Pumice-rich soils are often encountered in many engineering projects and their geotechnical characterisation is very important. Due to the highly crushable nature of the pumice sand components, the applicability of current empirical correlations which have been derived from hard-grained sands needs investigation.

The presentation focuses on the findings of the research projects conducted at the University of Auckland (with the support of EQC, NHRP and QuakeCoRE) to characterize the pumice sand properties and the dynamic and liquefaction characteristics of natural pumiceous deposits through field testing, high- quality soil sampling and laboratory testing. Moreover, the procedure developed to quantify the pumice contents of soil samples based on the crushability feature of the materials is presented.

Finally, based on the results obtained to date, an empirical chart correlating shear wave velocity and cyclic resistance as a function of the soil’s pumice contents is proposed.

Liquefaction Assessment of Natural Pumiceous Deposits

Presented by Dr Rolando Orense Associate Professor, University of Auckland

Pumice-rich soils are often encountered in many engineering projects and their geotechnical characterisation is very important.  Due to the highly crushable nature of the pumice sand components, the applicability of current empirical correlations which have been derived from hard-grained sands needs investigation.

The presentation focuses on the findings of the research projects conducted at the University of Auckland (with the support of EQC, NHRP and QuakeCoRE) to characterize the pumice sand properties and the dynamic and liquefaction characteristics of natural pumiceous deposits through field testing, high- quality soil sampling and laboratory testing. Moreover, the procedure developed to quantify the pumice contents of soil samples based on the crushability feature of the materials is presented.

Finally, based on the results obtained to date, an empirical chart correlating shear wave velocity and cyclic resistance as a function of the soil’s pumice contents is proposed.

Separation of Pumice from Soil Mixtures

Presented by Mark Springer, Senior Lecturer, University of Canterbury
Recipient of the NZGS JW Ridley Geomechanics Paper Award

 

Pumice-rich deposits are found in a number of locations around the world, and in particular across large areas of the North Island of New Zealand. Pumice grains are commonly described as being lightweight, highly crushable, and vesicular in nature. These characteristics give rise to a unique set of behaviours under loading, and pumice-rich soils are highly problematic in terms of in situ characterisation in large part due to their crushability. The presence of pumice within a soil mixture has the potential to completely alter the stress–strain behaviour of these soils as well as require a different interpretation of results from commonly used site characterisation technique. It is therefore important to be able to determine quantitatively the percentage of pumice within a given soil deposit. This paper proposes a methodology based on a gravity separation of pumice-bearing mixtures with a heavy fluid. The application of themethod to artificial mixtures of fine pumice and non-pumiceous sands is shown to be sufficiently accurate for engineering purposes.

Mark obtained his PhD from the University of Cambridge, following research on the axial load distributions on piled foundations in
liquefiable soils using a geotechnical centrifuge. Since joining the CNRE department at the University of Canterbury, Mark has been
involved in a series of element testing projects on New Zealand soils, including the silty soils around Christchurch and more recently,
the pumice-rich deposits of the North Island. As a core part of this work, Mark has been trialling the use of the innovative gel-push
samplers developed by Kiso-Jiban consultants in Japan

KINDLY SPONSORED BY GEOTECHNICS AND THE UNIVERSITY OF WAIKATO

Wellington YGP Mini Symposium

A one day event where the young people of the local geotechnical industry gather to share and learn from each other.

This is for Wellington and lower North Island based young members of the NZGS
(under 35 and/or less than 10 years’
experience).

We want people at all levels of experience within this range, from first year graduates to those getting their first grey hairs!

Your presentation summary is due by Wednesday 2nd June

Please email your summary to  wgtnygp@gmail.com