NZGS Climate Change Symposium

The New Zealand Geotechnical Society in partnership with Engineering New Zealand, The Sustainability Society and MBIE will host a symposium to discuss the role of geotechnical engineers in climate change.

The symposium will engage the geotechnical industry in New Zealand and start discussions on how our industry can reach the carbon emission goals set by the New Zealand government. What does it mean for the geotechnical industry in New Zealand? Where do we need to stretch, collaborate and re-invent ourselves to meet the targets? Regardless if you work as a consultant, contractor, academic or policy maker, we are looking for a broad range of different opinions as this topic is important for all of us and collaboration, innovation and transformation are critical to start the process.

We hope to spark your interest and stimulate many constructive discussions about this topic and we want to hear different opinions and approaches how to overcome some of the current barriers. Collaboration is the key to reach these targets and help building a more sustainable future.

We are delighted to invite you to submit a presentation abstract and to register your attendance. Presentations will be short (10-15 mins) and we are specifically seeking presentations around the following topics:

  • Innovation
  • Challenges
  • Tools and techniques
    • adaptation, transition and mitigation
    • overcoming barriers to climate ready project

Preparation of a paper is not required. However, authors are welcome to submit a paper in support of their presentation should they wish to do so. Closing date for abstracts is 8 August.

We hope to hear from you with an abstract and to see you in September for this inaugural symposium.

AGS Online Webinar: Four decades of study on reinforced embankments on soft soils and rate-sensitive clays

Register HERE

Prof. Kerry Rowe

This webinar presents the progress made in the last few decades for construction on soft soils using new technologies. This includes basal reinforcement, prefabricated vertical drains, column/piled support embankments, etc. The presentation follows the author’s 40-year investigation on construction of embankments on soft and/or difficult soils ranging from peat to rate sensitive soft clay and silt.

About the speaker

Kerry Rowe

Prof. Kerry RoweBarrington Batchelor Distinguished University Professor Queens University, Canada

Educated at the University of Sydney Rowe worked with the Australian Government Department of Construction 8 years prior to immigrating to Canada. He spent 20 years as a professor at The University of Western Ontario, London, Canada. From 2000 to 2010, he served as Vice-Principal (Research) at Queen’s University in Kingston. Since 2010 he has held the Canada Research Chair in Geotechnical and Geoenvironmental Engineering at Queen’s where he is also the Barrington Batchelor Distinguished University Professor. His professional practice and research has covered a broad range of geotechnical and geoenvironmental engineering including extensive work on geotextiles, geomembranes, geogrids, geonets landfills, ponds, dams as well as reinforced embankments and walls. He is a past President of the International Geosynthetics Society, the Canadian Geotechnical Society and the Engineering Institute of Canada. He has been selected to present the world’s most prestigious named geotechnical lectures including the Giroud Lecture (2002), Rankine Lecture (2005), Karl Terzaghi Lecture (2017), and Mercer Lecture (2019). In 2013, the International Society for Soil Mechanics and Geotechnical Engineering created a named lecture to honour his pioneering contributions to geoenvironmental engineering, the ISSMGE R. Kerry Rowe Lecture. He has received numerous awards and been elected a a Distingished Member of ASCE (it hiighest award), Foreign Member of the US National Academy of Engineering, and a Fellow of the Royal Society (London, UK), UK Royal Academy of Engineering, the Royal Society of Canada, and the Canadian Academy of Engineering. He has been appointed an Officer of the Order of Canada (O.C.).

Register HERE

ON LINE – GNS Urban mapping in South Auckland: Geology and Geomorphology

Presented by Kyle Bland and Dougal Townsend

Due to Covid restrictions this event will now be on line  https://www.engineeringnz.org/courses-events/event/gns-urban-mapping-in-south-auckland/

This talk outlines the GNS Urban Mapping project that is near completion for the South Auckland area. Digital
geological and geomorphological maps have been produced, which emphasise the geological and landscape
evolution of this area. Kyle and Dougal are geologists working at GNS Science, based in Lower Hutt. They have
both worked on large geological mapping projects such as QMAP. Kyle’s research interests lie in
paleogeographic reconstructions of New Zealand’s past landscapes and environments, and educational
outreach targeting the general public — particularly school children and their teachers, and iwi. Dougal has
worked with the SLIDE project in Wellington, leading a team mapping the geomorphology of the city. Recently
he also completed a new geological map of the Tongariro National Park and is currently working on a new map
of the Auckland Volcanic Field.

Kindly sponsored by Geotechnics

2020 Hochstetter Lecture: How Tectonic & Surface Processes Interact to Shape the Landscape

Presented by Phaedra Upton, Senior Scientist, Geodynamics Team Leader, GNS Science

The landscape serves as a link between the solid Earth and the atmosphere. At many spatial and temporal scales, landscape morphology and topography provide a constraint on the tectonics of the Earth and processes active within it. To unravel these, we need to understand the complex relationships between surface processes, their drivers and the rocks upon which they act. I will explore recent developments in modelling tectonics and surface processes within a single deformational framework. I will focus on collisional settings such as New Zealand’s Southern Alps, SE Alaska and the Himalaya where rapid uplift combines with vigorous climate regimes to create dynamic landscapes.

RSVP: james.griffiths@beca.com

Thanks to our venue sponsor: GEOTECHNICS

2020 Hochstetter Lecture: How Tectonic & Surface Processes Interact to Shape the Landscape

Presented by Phaedra Upton, Senior Scientist, Geodynamics Team Leader, GNS Science

The landscape serves as a link between the solid Earth and the atmosphere. At many spatial and temporal scales, landscape morphology and topography provide a constraint on the tectonics of the Earth and processes active within it. To unravel these, we need to understand the complex relationships between surface processes, their drivers and the rocks upon which they act. I will explore recent developments in modelling tectonics and surface processes within a single deformational framework. I will focus on collisional settings such as New Zealand’s Southern Alps, SE Alaska and the Himalaya where rapid uplift combines with vigorous climate regimes to create dynamic landscapes.

 

Supporting Lecture:  The Southern Alps of New Zealand: An Integrated Picture of an Evolving Plate Boundary (This will be from 5.30pm at the same venue)

The Southern Alps of New Zealand – An integrated picture of an evolving plate boundary

The central South Island has long been a favourite site to study and model oblique continental collision, because the orogen is young, narrow, and a single structure, the Alpine Fault, takes up >70% of relative plate motion. The orogen is highly asymmetric and varies along strike as the nature of the two colliding plates change along the boundary. I will explore the 3D structure and kinematics of the orogen, and discuss how regional deep-seated tectonic processes of mountain building are geodynamically interconnected with climate, landscape, and near-surface geological processes that create local fluid flow, effective stress, and temperature anomalies.

 

Landslips in Northland – Observations from Select Case Studies

 

Online Presentation open to all NZGS Members

The presentation will comprise a selection of brief landslip case studies across Northland (and a couple in Auckland). The case studies will review how the landslips may have been identified and include a summary of some of the tools available for land stability assessment. A brief overview of use of terrain models in QGIS (open source software) and on-screen viewing of aerial photo stereo pairs will be given. The case studies also serve as a reminder of the regular occurrence of landslips across Northland, not just affecting roads but also in areas of both older and more recent development, most of which are not publicly reported.

The presentation will be followed by a chance for questions/discussions.

Bio – David is a geotechnical engineer and has been Northland based for 4 years prior to which he worked for T+T in Auckland for 10 years. David has been involved in assessing landslips from Dunedin to the Far North, but particularly in Auckland and Northland, primarily associated with EQC claims.

 

Register Here

 

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.