2020 Hochstetter Lecture: How Tectonic & Surface Processes Interact to Shape the Landscape

Presented by Phaedra Upton, Senior Scientist, Geodynamics Team Leader, GNS Science

The landscape serves as a link between the solid Earth and the atmosphere. At many spatial and temporal scales, landscape morphology and topography provide a constraint on the tectonics of the Earth and processes active within it. To unravel these, we need to understand the complex relationships between surface processes, their drivers and the rocks upon which they act. I will explore recent developments in modelling tectonics and surface processes within a single deformational framework. I will focus on collisional settings such as New Zealand’s Southern Alps, SE Alaska and the Himalaya where rapid uplift combines with vigorous climate regimes to create dynamic landscapes.

 

Supporting Lecture:  The Southern Alps of New Zealand: An Integrated Picture of an Evolving Plate Boundary (This will be from 5.30pm at the same venue)

The Southern Alps of New Zealand – An integrated picture of an evolving plate boundary

The central South Island has long been a favourite site to study and model oblique continental collision, because the orogen is young, narrow, and a single structure, the Alpine Fault, takes up >70% of relative plate motion. The orogen is highly asymmetric and varies along strike as the nature of the two colliding plates change along the boundary. I will explore the 3D structure and kinematics of the orogen, and discuss how regional deep-seated tectonic processes of mountain building are geodynamically interconnected with climate, landscape, and near-surface geological processes that create local fluid flow, effective stress, and temperature anomalies.

 

Landslips in Northland – Observations from Select Case Studies

 

Online Presentation open to all NZGS Members

The presentation will comprise a selection of brief landslip case studies across Northland (and a couple in Auckland). The case studies will review how the landslips may have been identified and include a summary of some of the tools available for land stability assessment. A brief overview of use of terrain models in QGIS (open source software) and on-screen viewing of aerial photo stereo pairs will be given. The case studies also serve as a reminder of the regular occurrence of landslips across Northland, not just affecting roads but also in areas of both older and more recent development, most of which are not publicly reported.

The presentation will be followed by a chance for questions/discussions.

Bio – David is a geotechnical engineer and has been Northland based for 4 years prior to which he worked for T+T in Auckland for 10 years. David has been involved in assessing landslips from Dunedin to the Far North, but particularly in Auckland and Northland, primarily associated with EQC claims.

 

Register Here

 

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.