21st NZGS National Symposium – Dunedin 2020

UPDATE:  THIS EVENT IS POSTPONDED AND WILL NOW TAKE PLACE IN MARCH 2021

Symposium theme

The theme of the Symposium is inspired by the profound changes currently experienced internationally and in New Zealand:

  • Natural disasters associated with climate change effects, are becoming increasingly frequent and severe.
  • The learnings from the recent Canterbury and Kaikōura seismic events are shifting our thinking in New Zealand with respect to the way we perceive and address the seismic risk.
  • Increasing urbanism and growth of population around the cities create more needs for capacity and resiliency of lifelines.
  • The fragile international economy is limiting available resources, and potential changes in insurance practices and cover policies require a different approach in achieving resilience for our communities.

These are pressing future challenges for the geotechnical profession, but also great opportunities. The profession is playing a key role in achieving sustainability of our built environment and communities.

At the same time, new technologies, such as intelligent real time remote monitoring systems, Unmanned Aerial Vehicles and computer power create new capabilities. New wireless communication technologies enable dissemination of knowledge and collaboration, without geographical or other barriers. New regulation and guidelines framework provide an invaluable tool for benchmarking geotechnical engineering practice.
Our past failures and achievements can provide invaluable learnings and assist us prepare for the future challenges and make the most of the future opportunities.

Symposium purpose and format

The Symposium aims to attract the most recent developments in geotechnical engineering, and associated disciplines in New Zealand and internationally. We look for stimulating technical discussions and out-of-the-box ideas in the fields of engineering geology, geotechnical engineering, seismology, geophysics, new technologies.

The Symposium will comprise a pre-symposium half-day workshop, one-day field study, and two days of technical talks and discussions. We will use a range of formats: keynote speakers, plenary special technical sessions and discussions, speaker presentations, and poster exhibitions.

Collaboration and communication with structural and infrastructural engineering will be key component of our technical sessions.

Forensic Engineering Investigation (Akd)

Recent earthquakes and building failures have highlighted the need for more investigating engineers who can apply basic techniques and draw conclusions on the extent of damage and the need for suitable repairs. The course will cover basic investigation techniques, data collection and analysis and the procedures you need to follow to produce a credible forensic engineering report.
Duration: 8 hours
Presenter: Stephen Jenkins

Cost:

$900.00 incl. GST

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.

Guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land

Ministry of Business, Innovation and Employment (MBIE) released the guidance in 2017. This was developed collaboratively by MBIE with the Ministry for the Environment (MfE) and the Earthquake Commission (EQC), and other key parties. Engineering New Zealand with the funding support of EQC are pleased to offer this subsidised course which will bring planning and engineering professionals together to learn how to put the guidance in to practice.

Course Objectives and Learning Outcomes

The day will start with some basic presentation sessions to introduce the guidance.  It will then progress to hands-on group work to develop understanding of the technical assessment process and its application to planning and decision making. This also helps to develop the collaborative skills, experience and cross-discipline networks required to implement the guidance effectively in different decision-making contexts.

After the course it is expected that:

  • engineers will be able to communicate information about the technical assessment in a manner that can be understood by planners (and then in turn be explained to other stakeholders and decision makers)
  • planners will be able to communicate to engineers the planning or consent decision contexts for which technical information is required
  • engineers and planners will have the skills to collaborate to agree the appropriate scope of work for technical assessments required to support specific plan and decision-making processes (a meeting of minds about “fitness for purpose”).

Presenter Information

The course will be facilitated by Marje Russ and Mike Jacka from Tonkin + Taylor.
Marje and Mike were both involved in the development of Planning and engineering guidance for potentially liquefaction-prone land.